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Some of the most innocuous household items can turn into an arrest for possession of drug paraphernalia, especially when combined with other circumstances or evidence of criminal behavior. A plastic zipper bag, food scale, or even a piece of fruit become illegal contraband under some interpretations of North Carolina’s drug laws. Though the implications are less severe for possession of marijuana paraphernalia as compared to possession of drug paraphernalia for other controlled substances, a conviction could lead to serious criminal penalties and other consequences you didn’t expect.

However, because the prosecution’s burden requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt, there are multiple opportunities to defend against a drug paraphernalia charge. Hiring an experienced Charlotte drug lawyer from Randall & Stump, PLLC is the key to raising this doubt, which could lead to a dismissal or acquittal.

To schedule a free, confidential case consultation, contact us today at (980) 237-4579.

North Carolina Drug Laws on Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

In addition to defining offenses for possession, sale, and trafficking in controlled substances, the North Carolina law contains provisions regarding certain drug-related items. This law makes it illegal to possess any paraphernalia when the intent is for drug:

  • Consumption
  • Production
  • Planting
  • Growing
  • Packaging
  • Storage
  • Concealment on the body, in a vehicle, or in a residence
  • Digestion
  • Inhalation
  • Processing
  • Other types of prohibited usage

However, there are two categories of possession of drug paraphernalia under NC law:

Possession of Paraphernalia for Other Controlled Substances (North Carolina General Statutes [NCGS] § 90-113.22)

If you have any items of drug paraphernalia on your person, and circumstances indicate that you intend to commit a crime involving controlled substances, other than marijuana, the offense is a Class 1 misdemeanor.

Possession of Marijuana Paraphernalia (NCGS § 90-113.22A)

North Carolina has not decriminalized marijuana, but the severity of punishment for possessing marijuana paraphernalia is lower as compared to other controlled substances. If charged with possession of marijuana paraphernalia, you will face a Class 3 misdemeanor if you’re caught with items that demonstrate an intent to commit marijuana crimes.

Drug Paraphernalia That Could Lead to Your Arrest

The law includes several categories of items that could result in charges, and the language is extremely broad. Almost any household or personal articles may be unlawful if they can be used to commit a drug crime. Such items include:

  • Pipes, bongs, grinders, and rolling papers
  • Spoons, hypodermic needles, and e-cigarettes
  • Scales, and other measuring equipment
  • Plastic baggies, containers, film canisters, prescription bottles and storage devices
  • Kits for planting, growing, or manufacturing controlled substances
  • Testing and cleaning utensils

Note that you can also be arrested for drug possession in Charlotte, NC if there’s any trace amount or residue within the drug paraphernalia item that’s in your possession. Therefore, you could also face additional misdemeanor or felony charges depending upon the amount and type of the drug.

Drug Paraphernalia Penalties

The punishments for a conviction on drug paraphernalia charges vary depending on the type of drug the paraphernalia is being used for, but generally includes:

Class 3 Misdemeanor

If you are convicted for possession of marijuana paraphernalia, you could be face up to 20 days in jail, and be sentenced to pay fines reaching $200. In many cases, you may be eligible for probation if you have no criminal history and there are no other offenses connected to your marijuana paraphernalia charge. Additionally, depending on a number of factors, the charge may be able to be dismissed and an experienced drug lawyer knows the strategies for approaching the prosecutor and negotiating this outcome.

Class 1 Misdemeanor

When your conviction is for possession of drug paraphernalia related to controlled substances other than marijuana, a judge could sentence you to up to 120 days in jail. You will likely be required to pay a fine, but the amount depends upon the circumstances surrounding your case. As with possession of marijuana paraphernalia, depending on a number of factors, the charge may be able to be dismissed.

Collateral Consequences of a Conviction

Even though drug paraphernalia and marijuana paraphernalia charges are a misdemeanor offense, the conviction impacts every area of your life. You could have difficulties with current or future employment, and your professional license could be revoked. Additional concerns may involve:

  • Educational opportunities
  • Loans and student financial aid
  • Your housing and living arrangements
  • Child custody and visitation matters
  • Immigration issues

Defenses to Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

In addition to options for reducing your sentence to probation, a criminal defense attorney may be able to get a drug paraphernalia or marijuana paraphernalia charge dropped entirely. One approach is to expose weaknesses in the prosecution’s case against you. The prosecutor must be able to prove that you were using an item with the intent to commit a crime involving controlled substances. This can be a heavy burden with some utensils, equipment, or everyday devices that have a legitimate, non-criminal use.

Plus, you may have other arguments against drug paraphernalia charges. An important defense involves your constitutional rights, as police are prohibited from conducting unlawful searches and seizures. If evidence was obtained in violation of your rights, these items are not admissible in court and cannot be used against you. Depending on the facts of your case, our Charlotte drug lawyers can tell you more about how to get a drug paraphernalia or marijuana paraphernalia charge dropped after reviewing the details of your case.